Data Center Nordics II

Published: October 2016. 62 pages. 37 Tables & Charts

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Datacenter Nordics II is the second annual report from BroadGroup covering 6 markets in the region: Norway, Sweden, Finland, Iceland, Denmark and Estonia.

This new research report from BroadGroup suggests that the Nordic markets are positioning as a giant European Data Hub based on the abundance of green power available supported by low energy taxation, increased connectivity and a stable economic environment.

Datacenter Nordics II has reviewed current data center developments revealing a changing picture over the past twelve months and suggests that m2 space across the region will increase by more than 34% by the end of this year. Available power – all based on renewable resources – will increase by a similar level across the period. 

Norway in particular promises several very large scale developments, one of which includes potential access to 2.2 GW of power, although the country still requires more investment in international connectivity to take a competitive lead. Data Center facilities in the Nordic Region are able to make use of the low average temperatures to provide external “free” cooling.

Users are also attracted by the capability to provision a typical request for 1 MW of power in a matter of days – where “power rich” regions such as Iceland, Norway and the Node Pole region of Sweden - have an abundance of power which can be made available quickly. 

Sweden remains the largest market in installed capacity with more than 35% of m2 space, but new build in Norway will challenge this position in the coming years.

The presence of webscales in the region has also highlighted the opportunity for international enterprises to collocate or invest in the build of new infrastructure.

The report found that Data centers are responding to the perceived international hub opportunity and assembling a mix of credentials including proven low-PUE, internationally recognized certification, data protection compliance, an expanded cloud services portfolio and increased connectivity.

Executive Summary – Data Center Nordics II

 

Section One – Nordic Region Data Center market drivers to the end of 2017
1.Introduction
1.1 Nordic Region Data Center market drivers
1.2 Nordic Markets supply side benefits
1.3 Investment by Webscales
1.4 Nordic Region Data Center Location Strengths and Weaknesses Analysis
1.4.1 Denmark
1.4.2 Finland
1.4.3 Iceland
1.4.4 Norway
1.4.5 Sweden
1.4.6 Estonia

Section Two – Data Center Power in the Nordic Region
2. Introduction
2.1 Comparative analysis of the key power providers in the Nordic Region
2.1.1 Denmark
2.1.2 Finland
2.1.3 Iceland
2.1.4 Norway
2.1.5 Sweden
2.1.6 Estonia
2.2 Energy taxes in the Nordic Region
2.2.1 Denmark
2.2.2 Finland
2.2.3 Iceland
2.2.4 Norway
2.2.5 Sweden
2.2.6 Estonia
2.3 Other taxes in the Nordic Region – including Corporate Tax rates
2.4 Energy company price developments in the Nordic Region
2.4.1 Denmark – energy company price developments
2.4.2 Finland – energy company price developments
2.4.3 Iceland – energy company price developments
2.4.4 Norway – energy company price developments
2.4.5 Sweden – energy company price developments
2.4.6 Estonia – energy company price developments
2.5 Renewable energy players as a percentage of market supply by country
2.5.1 Denmark – proportion of renewable energy
2.5.2 Finland – proportion of renewable energy
2.5.3 Iceland – proportion of renewable energy
2.5.4 Norway – proportion of renewable energy
2.5.5 Sweden – proportion of renewable energy
2.5.6 Estonia – proportion of renewable energy

Section Three – Data Center Connectivity in the Nordic Region
3.Introduction
3.1 The landscape for international Nordic submarine cable connectivity
3.1.1 Denmark – international submarine cable connectivity
3.1.2 Finland – international submarine cable connectivity
3.1.3 Iceland – international submarine cable connectivity
3.1.4 Norway – international submarine cable connectivity
3.1.5 Sweden – international submarine cable connectivity
3.1.6 Estonia – international submarine cable connectivity
3.2 Key players in national Data Center connectivity
3.2.1 Denmark – National fiber Data Center connectivity
3.2.2 Finland – National fiber Data Center connectivity
3.2.3 Iceland – National fiber Data Center connectivity
3.2.4 Norway – National fiber Data Center connectivity
3.2.5 Sweden – National fiber Data Center connectivity
3.2.6 Estonia – National fiber Data Center connectivity
3.3 Domestic fiber-optic providers in the Nordic Region – comparative availability and pricing
3.3.1 Denmark – domestic fiber-optic providers comparative availability and pricing
3.3.2 Finland – domestic fiber-optic providers comparative availability and pricing
3.3.3 Iceland – domestic fiber-optic providers comparative availability and pricing
3.3.4 Norway – domestic fiber-optic providers comparative availability and pricing
3.3.5 Sweden – domestic fiber-optic providers comparative availability and pricing
3.3.6 Estonia – domestic fiber-optic providers comparative availability and pricing
3.4 New international submarine cable developments

Section Four – Key Data Center operators in the Nordic Region
4. Introduction
4.1.2 Bahnhof
4.1.2 Blix
4.1.3 Bulk Infrastructure
4.1.4 Elisa
4.1.5 Ficolo
4.1.6 Fortlax
4.1.7 Global Connect
4.1.8 Green Mountain
4.1.9 Hydro66
4.1.10 Lefdal Mine Datacenter
4.1.11 Levica
4.1.12 Linxdatacenter
4.1.13 Nianet
4.1.14 Rockan Data Center
4.1.15 Siminn
4.1.16 Stokab
4.1.17 Sungard AS
4.1.18 TDC
4.1.19 Verizon
4.1.20 Verne Global
4.1.21 Vodafone
4.2 New Data Center developments in the Nordic Region

Section Five – International Data Center Players in the Nordic Region
5. Introduction
5.1 Colt Telecom
5.2 DigiPlex
5.3 Equinix
5.4 Interxion
5.5 Nordic Data Center Providers in multiple markets in the Nordic Region
5.5.1 Basefarm
5.5.2 IP-Only
5.5.3 Telia

Section Six – Global Data Center Players investing in the Nordic Region
6. Introduction
6.1 The impact of market entry by the Global Digital Content Data Center Players
6.2 facebook
6.3 Apple
6.4 Google
6.5 Other Digital Content Data Center Providers
6.5.1 KnCMiner
6.5.2 Microsoft
6.5.3 Yandex

Section Seven – Conclusions and Forecasts from the end of 2016 to the end of 2017
7. Key Conclusions to the Data Center Nordic II report
7.1 Nordic Data Center raised space forecast (m2) – from 2015 to the end of 2016
7.1.1 Nordic Data Center raised space forecast (m2) to the end of 2017
7.2 Data Center power forecast (MW) – from the end of 2015 to the end of 2016
7.2.1 Data Center power forecast (MW) to the end of 2017
7.3 Key Conclusions to the Data Center Nordics II report

Figure 1: Data Centre providers by Nordic Country – (by m2 %) as of the end of 2016 Source: BroadGroup

Figure 2: Data Centre providers and facilities growth by Nordic Country as of the end of 2016 Source: BroadGroup

Figure 3: Data Centre power (MW) growth by Nordic Country as of the end of 2016 Source: BroadGroup

Figure 4: Data Center business models by % of m2 space Source: BroadGroup

Figure 5: penetration rates for FTTH/B services in the Nordic Region, compared with the EU-28 average rate – in % Source: FTTH Council

Figure 6: Nordic Sources of Energy – in % Source: NordREG (2014)

Figure 7: Corporate Tax Rate Nordic Source: KPMG/Industry

Figure 8. Business energy products provided by Hafslund Strom Source: Hafslund Strom

Figure 9: Changes in Vattenfall electricity pricing per kW Hour by region in Swedish cents (from June 2014 to June 2016) Source: Vatenfall

Figure 10: Pricing per kW Hour in Euro cents (2H 2014) Source: Eurostat/BroadGroup

Figure 11: Proportion of renewable energy by Nordic Region and the EU-28 country average Source: Eurostat/BroadGroup

Figure 12: Key international submarine cable systems from Denmark Source: BroadGroup

Figure 13: Key international submarine cable systems from Finland Source: BroadGroup

Figure 14: Key international submarine cable systems from Iceland Source: BroadGroup

Figure 15: Key international submarine cable systems from Norway Source: BroadGroup

Figure 16: Key international submarine cable systems from Sweden Source: BroadGroup

Figure 17: Key international submarine cable systems from Estonia Source: BroadGroup

Figure 18: Key national fiber network systems Denmark Source: BroadGroup

Figure 19: Key national fiber network systems Finland Source: BroadGroup

Figure 20: Key national fiber network systems Iceland Source: BroadGroup

Figure 21: Key national fiber network systems Norway Source: BroadGroup

Figure 22: Key national fiber network systems Sweden Source: BroadGroup

Figure 23: Key national fiber network systems Estonia Source: BroadGroup

Figure 24: New international cables planned for the Nordic region Source: BroadGroup

Figure 25: Bahnhof Data Centers Sweden Source: BroadGroup

Figure 26: Blix Data Centers Source: BroadGroup

Figure 27: Bulk Data Centers Source: BroadGroup

Figure 28: Green Mountain Data Centers Source: BroadGroup

Figure 29: Sungard Data Centers Source: BroadGroup

Figure 30: DigiPlex Data Centers Source: BroadGroup

Figure 31: Equinix Data Centers Source: BroadGroup

Figure 32: Interxion Data Centers Source: BroadGroup

Figure 33: IP-Only Data Centers Source: BroadGroup

Figure 34: Data Center m2 growth 2015-2016 Source: BroadGroup

Figure 35: Data Center m2 growth forecast to end of 2017 Source: BroadGroup

Figure 36: Data Center MW growth 2015-2016 Source: BroadGroup

Figure 37: Data Center MW forecast to end 2017 Source: BroadGroup